• Birmanie: IDE bientôt possibles

    AFP Publié <time datetime="21-10-2012T16:20:00+02:00;" pubdate="">le 21/10/2012 à 16:20    </time>lien

    Une loi très attendue sur les investissements étrangers en Birmanie pourrait être finalisée "d'ici quelques jours", a déclaré dimanche le président Thein Sein, alors que le nouveau régime espère attirer les entreprises étrangères pour développer son économie.

    Le parlement avait adopté cette loi le mois dernier, mais le président, qui doit l'approuver également, l'avait renvoyée aux députés, alors que certains experts la jugeaient trop conservatrice. "Les opportunités d'emplois sont rares dans notre pays", a déclaré Thein Sein lors de sa première conférence de presse en Birmanie depuis qu'il a succédé à la junte dissoute en mars 2011. "Pour obtenir ces opportunités, nous avons vraiment besoin d'investissements étrangers. Alors nous avons révisé la loi sur les investissements directs étrangers et l'avons soumis au parlement. Je pense qu'elle sortira d'ici quelques jours", a-t-il ajouté.

    La loi doit être en accord avec les pays voisins, a-t-il précisé. "Si c'est le cas, les investisseurs viendront". Le texte voté en octobre facilitait l'investissement dans l'agriculture, la pêche, l'industrie et le tourisme. Il autorisait aussi les entreprises étrangères à acquérir 50% des parts de sociétés birmanes dans certains secteurs, un seuil jugé par certains analystes insuffisant, mais aussi potentiellement créateur de blocages.

    Dans un marché désormais reluqué ouvertement par les groupes européens et américains, le débat fait rage entre une véritable ouverture et un certain degré de protectionnisme, que préconisent responsables conservateurs et hommes d'affaires liés à l'ancienne junte.


    votre commentaire
  • Honored to introduce Aung San Suu Kyi as she accepts the Atlantic Council’s Global Citizen Award for her unwavering devotion to democracy and freedom.
    aung1

    votre commentaire
  • 22 September 2012 - 08H05  

    Aung San Suu Kyi visits UN, New York

    In this photo released by the United Nations, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon meets with Myanmar democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi, on September 21, at the UN Headquarters in New York.

    In this photo released by the United Nations, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon meets with Myanmar democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi, on September 21, at the UN Headquarters in New York.

    Aung San Suu Kyi, Myanmar's Member of Parliament and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, receives the Atlantic Council 2012 Global Citizen Award from Christine Lagarde, Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), on September 21, in New York.

    Aung San Suu Kyi, Myanmar's Member of Parliament and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, receives the Atlantic Council 2012 Global Citizen Award from Christine Lagarde, Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), on September 21, in New York.

    Aung San Suu Kyi (C), Myanmar's Member of Parliament and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, walks to the stage to receive the Atlantic Council 2012 Global Citizen Award, on September 21, in New York.

    Aung San Suu Kyi (C), Myanmar's Member of Parliament and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, walks to the stage to receive the Atlantic Council 2012 Global Citizen Award, on September 21, in New York.

    AFP - Myanmar democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi visited the United Nations and received a new award as she paid tribune to unknown fighters for democracy in her country.

    "Tonight I must pay tribute to my colleagues whose names are unknown to the world," said Suu Kyi as she received the 2012 Global Citizen Award from the Atlantic Council, a think tank that promotes constructive US leadership and engagement in international affairs.

    "Those unknown soldiers are so much bigger than others like me who are known and who had been given so many honors," she added.

    The award was presented to her by Christine Lagarde, managing director of the International Monetary Fund, at a dinner at New York's Plaza Hotel, on Friday.

    "I don't get intimidated easily: politics, money, power, economy, crisis," said the IMF chief. "But I tell you something, when it's resilience in the face of adversity, when it's simplicity in the face of success, when it is kindness, when it is spirituality, I get unbelievably intimidated ... I'm intimidated to introduce tonight Aung San Suu Kyi."

    Mentioning years spent by Suu Kyi under house arrest and her determination to carry on her fight for Myanmar democracy, Lagarde said that Suu Kyi's life was "our message."

    Myanmar was ruled by an iron-fisted junta for decades but, since taking office last year, a reformist government under former general Thein Sein has freed political prisoners and allowed Suu Kyi's party into electoral politics.

    Freed in 2010 after 15 years under house arrest, Suu Kyi received a rapturous welcome on her first visit to Washington since her release.

    Earlier this week, she was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, the top honor bestowed by the legislature, and met at the White House with President Barack Obama.

    During her trip to the United States, Suu Kyi endorsed the removal of sanctions on Myanmar, also known as Burma, which were imposed to punish the junta for its formerly oppressive rule in the Southeast Asian country.

    Before her awards ceremony at the Atlantic Council, Suu Kyi visited UN headquarters where she met with UN secretary general Ban Ki-moon, who recalled that the Myanmar democracy leader worked in New York at the United Nations headquarters from 1969 to 1971.

    "I would like to welcome her home," Ban said. "She is now a global symbol of human rights. We have great expectations and hope that she will lead this path of reconciliation and greater participatory democracy and development of her country."

    Suu Kyi said that to achieve genuine democracy for Burma, all people "have to learn to work together."

    The agenda of Suu Kyi's unprecedented 18-day US tour includes nearly 100 events across the United States. The Myanmar democracy leader will head on September 25 to Fort Wayne, Indiana, to meet the sizable Burmese community that has resettled in the Midwestern city.

    The hectic schedule has worried some of Suu Kyi's supporters. The 67-year-old fell ill in June during a punishing tour of Europe.


    votre commentaire
  • 23 September 2012 - 08H19  

     

    Suu Kyi: help us complete path to democracy

    Myanmar democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi speaks at American University in Washington DC, September 20. Her desire is that "Burma can once again become the country it was way back before the military regime took over, a country of hope."

    Myanmar democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi speaks at American University in Washington DC, September 20. Her desire is that "Burma can once again become the country it was way back before the military regime took over, a country of hope."

    Myanmar democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi speaks after being presented with a US Congressional Gold Medal in Washington DC on September 19. Suu Kyi is on an 18-day tour of the US, her first since being freed from house arrest two years ago.

    Myanmar democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi speaks after being presented with a US Congressional Gold Medal in Washington DC on September 19. Suu Kyi is on an 18-day tour of the US, her first since being freed from house arrest two years ago.

    Aung San Suu Kyi, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, receives the Atlantic Council 2012 Global Citizen Award from Christine Lagarde, Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund, on September 21. Lagarde said she was "intimidated" by Suu Kyi's kindness and spirituality.

    Aung San Suu Kyi, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, receives the Atlantic Council 2012 Global Citizen Award from Christine Lagarde, Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund, on September 21. Lagarde said she was "intimidated" by Suu Kyi's kindness and spirituality.

    AFP - Myanmar democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi has expressed hope that her country will complete its transition to democracy and become a nation of hope.

    "I came today to thank you all and to ask all of you to stay with us until we have completed the journey to democracy, and we get to the point when we too can help others," she said Saturday in a speech at Queens College in New York.

    Her desire, she said, is that "Burma can once again become the country it was way back before the military regime took over, a country of hope." Burma is the old name for Myanmar.

    Speaking to heavy applause, the 67-year-old Nobel peace laureate spoke of change in her country, where a military regime was replaced last year by a civilian government.

    "While we are not yet in any way near our goal of a truly democratic society... there has been change, not yet all the changes necessary to make sure we are going to be a genuinely democratic society, but there have been changes.

    Now a member of parliament, Suu Kyi is free to travel after spending 15 years under house arrest, and lives in a country with newfound freedom of the press.

    "Two years ago, there were just two state papers. And now there are so many journals, new magazines, news journals," she said.

    Suu Kyi, who this week received the top honor the US Congress can bestow on someone -- the Congressional Gold Medal -- came to New York after visiting Washington as part of an 18-day tour of the United States, her first since being freed from house arrest two years ago.

    On Friday, she visited the United Nations and received an award from the Atlantic Council think-tank, as she paid tribute to unknown fighters for democracy in her country.

    The award was presented by Christine Lagarde, managing director of the International Monetary Fund, who said she was "intimidated" by Suu Kyi's kindness and spirituality.

    Other award recipients included former US secretary of state Henry Kissinger, ex-UN high commissioner for refugees Sadako Ogata of Japan, and American musician and humanitarian Quincy Jones.

    Myanmar was ruled by an iron-fisted junta for decades but, since taking office last year, a reformist government under former general Thein Sein has freed political prisoners and allowed Suu Kyi's party into electoral politics.

    Suu Kyi's visit coincides with a three-day trip by Thein Sein to the UN, and there have been concerns that she will upstage his visit, despite his work pushing through reforms.

    Earlier this week, Suu Kyi also met at the White House with President Barack Obama.

    She endorsed the removal of sanctions imposed on Myanmar to punish the junta for its formerly oppressive rule in the Southeast Asian country.

    The agenda of Suu Kyi's unprecedented US tour includes nearly 100 events across the country. The Myanmar democracy leader will head on September 25 to Fort Wayne, Indiana, to meet the sizable Burmese community that has resettled in the Midwestern city.

    Her other stops include Louisville, Kentucky as well as San Francisco and Los Angeles.


    votre commentaire
  • lien

    Levée de la censure de la presse en Birmanie : "L’autocensure reste une menace sérieuse"

    Capture de la première une sans censure du journal indépendant "Venus News Weekly", qui titre "Après plus de 48 ans, la censure a priori est abolie". La photo montre des journalistes en train de manifester contre la censure, à Rangoun, le 4 août dernier, avec des t-shirt avec l'inscription "Arrêtez de tuer la presse". 
      
    Le gouvernement birman a annoncé lundi 20 août  l’abolition de la censure officielle qui pesait sur les médias depuis un demi-siècle. Une initiative saluée comme une avancée démocratique. Notre Observateur, journaliste à Rangoun, estime toutefois que le chemin vers une vraie liberté de la presse reste semé d’embûches.
     
    Car si les journalistes ne seront plus tenus de soumettre leurs écrits aux autorités avant publication, le bureau de la censure n’a pas disparu et pourra toujours interdire, a posteriori, les publications qui ne lui conviennent pas. Le gouvernement n’a pas non plus supprimé les lois qui lui permettent d’arrêter des journalistes et de fermer les rédactions considérées comme une menace à la sécurité nationale. De plus, la presse indépendante reste soumise à l’interdiction de publier de manière quotidienne (seuls les hebdomadaires de la presse indépendante sont autorisés).
     
    Depuis la dissolution de la junte, en mars 2011, et la mise en place d’un gouvernement civil (au sein duquel siègent toujours d’anciens généraux), les autorités ont commencé à desserrer progressivement l’étau de la censure. Le nouveau gouvernement a en effet entamé une série de réformes importantes, incluant notamment la libération des prisonniers politiques. Et l’opposante Aung San Suu Kyi a pu faire son entrée au Parlement en avril 2012, après avoir été maintenue en résidence surveillée pendant 15 ans.
    Contributeurs

    “Cette initiative va encourager les journalistes à repousser les limites”

    Ye Naing Moe est journaliste indépendant à Rangoun.
     
    Beaucoup de journalistes saluent avec prudence cette annonce. Ils font preuve d’un optimisme modéré qu’ils tirent de leur expérience. Les journaux seront toujours contraints d’envoyer leurs articles au ministère de l’Information après publication et resteront toujours menacés de fermeture. Nous espérons néanmoins que ces dispositions disparaîtront , et que ceci ne sera qu’une phase transitoire.
     
    Les mesures annoncées par le gouvernement constituent malgré tout un grand pas en avant. Avant, nous journalistes, devions penser à la censure avant même de commencer de rédiger un article. Je ne pense pas que les journaux vont changer en profondeur leur façon de couvrir l'information. Mais cela devrait en revanche les encourager à repousser les limites.
     
    Au cours de l’année passée, les censeurs faisaient déjà preuve de plus d’ indulgence. Des journaux ont pu écrire sur l’opposante Aung San Suu Kyi et rendre compte de cas de corruption impliquant des fonctionnaires.
     
    Le grand public veut en savoir davantage sur la corruption. Je pense que c’est sur ce sujet que les journaux vont essayer d’aller plus loin. Il sera également intéressant de voir s’ils vont utiliser cette nouvelle liberté pour écrire sur le général Than Shwe [ancien chef de la junte militaire, ndlr] et ses amis militaires. Avant, c’était très compliqué d’en parler. Il se pourrait que ce soit toujours le cas aujourd’hui, vu que certains de ses amis font partie de l’actuel gouvernement.
     
    "La censure est dans nos propres têtes"
     
    Je pense qu’il sera toujours difficile de couvrir les conflits ethniques, car les journalistes pourraient être accusés par les autorités de "traiter avec des organisations illégales", comme le dit la loi. Quand je suis parti couvrir le conflit dans l’Etat de Kachin en mai denier, j’étais très nerveux parce que je courais le risque d’être arrêté. Heureusement, ce ne fût pas le cas, mais les autorités auraient facilement pu se servir de cette loi pour le faire.
     
    L'autocensure est une grave menace pour la liberté de la presse dans le pays. Nous avons vécu sous ce régime pendant cinq décennies, alors la censure est dans nos propres têtes. Il nous faudra du temps pour réaliser que les choses ont changé. Toutefois, les plus jeunes d’entre nous n’ont pas connu les mauvaises expériences qu’ont vécues nos aînés et ils semblent davantage prêts à affronter les défis de cette nouvelle ère.
     
    Pour le moment, la nouvelle loi sur les médias est notre première préoccupation [un texte a été soumis à plusieurs responsables de journaux en Birmanie afin qu’ils donnent leur avis. Il devrait déterminer un code de déontologie ainsi que les droits et devoirs des journalistes, ndlr]. Ce projet de loi devrait être bientôt soumis au vote du Parlement. Bien sûr, le ministère de l’Information affirme qu’elle constitue une formidable avancée. Mais tant que nous ne saurons pas ce que cette loi contient, nous resterons sur nos gardes.

    votre commentaire


    Suivre le flux RSS des articles de cette rubrique
    Suivre le flux RSS des commentaires de cette rubrique